Timbered medieval House Staff Pick

  • April 08, 2013
  • 790 Downloads
  • 4 Likes
  • Blender 2.6x
  • Render: Cycles
  • Creator: hotzst
  • License: CC-BY-SA
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Description:

Model of a half timbered medieval two story building. Model ist based on one of Manorial (see http://blenderartists.org/forum/showthread.php?280950-Roman-and-Medieval-European-Architecture)

While I started the model as an exerciese in low poly modeling, it ended up with too many faces, though the model does not lend itself for any closeups.

For background on the modeling see http://blenderartists.org/forum/showthread.php?285485-Half-timbered-house

The size of the model is largely due to the big image textures included.

Comments:

  • FayZee profile picture
    FayZee

    Convincing architecture - the timber arrangements are realistic.

    I had to look up the term "half-timbered" because here in England it usually refers to houses where the ground floor storey is built of stone and the upper is timbered. In my town we have a fairly unspoiled old fashioned High Street lined with half-timbered shops.

    But I see the term also refers to houses that are fully timbered, with the meaning that they are constructed of load-bearing timber filled in with other material.

    I can't quite make out what the infill is in this house.

    Written April 08, 2013
  • FayZee profile picture
    FayZee

    This is what I would call a half-timbered house:

    http://www.blendswap.com/blends/view/67504

    It had windows when it was first uploaded, but they've been removed becasue of my comment.

    Written April 08, 2013
  • hotzst profile picture
    hotzst

    Thanks for your input. I tend to use the terms timbered and half-timbered interchangeably. To me it simply means it is not fully timbered, like a shed. The plaster is loam applied on a structure of reed.

    Written April 08, 2013
  • FayZee profile picture
    FayZee

    Ah, loam, I thought it might be something like clay. I've never seen anything made of this, so I checked it out on Wikipedia and elsewhere. Interesting, it seems to have been in widespread use - "one of the oldest technologies for house construction in the world".

    Possibly a better insulator than modern breeze block. Does it attract creepy crawlies, I wonder.

    Written April 08, 2013